NCPA - National Center for Policy Analysis

Daily Policy Digest

Who Benefits From The "Right to Try" Experimental Medicines?

Thirty-one states have now passed laws giving patients the "Right to Try" experimental medicines. However, they do not appear to be getting the medicines. There are two problems and one solution, according to NCPA Senior Fellow John R. Graham...

NCPA Statement on Vice Presidential Debate

The ideas presented last night defined each potential administration; from Senator Kaine we heard a promise of more government, and from Governor Pence, we heard a plea for less. While the Vice Presidential debate was a decidedly more thoughtful discussion about critical policy issues, we’re still not clear whether either administration has a detailed plan for solving the aforementioned critical issues, writes James H. Amos, NCPA President & CEO...

NCPA Analysis of the Vice Presidential Debate Tonight

National Center for Policy Analysis policy experts will be providing analysis during and after the next three debates, starting with the vice presidential debate tonight. To get the most out of tonight's vice presidential candidates' debate, follow and share NCPA policy experts on Twitter as they comment and offer real time analysis of this and the remaining two presidential candidates' debates.

A Modest Proposal to Reduce the Price of EpiPens

Posturing politicians on Capitol Hill conducted a hearing, in which they grilled Heather Bresch, CEO of Mylan. N.V., which makes EpiPens. Prices of EpiPens have skyrocketed in the last few years. The politicians ignored a fundamental reform to the FDA's powers, which would quickly reduce prices of EpiPen, writes NCPA Senior Fellow John R. Graham...

CAFE Standards Distort Auto Production and Push Jobs South

Once praised for refusing to accept a bailout, Ford is now taking heat for deciding build all small cars in Mexico. Ford already manufactures the Fiesta model in Mexico, and the Focus and C-Max will follow after the newly-proposed $1.6 billion plant is finished. Given that Ford sales have risen strongly since the recession, what is the reason for this change in direction? The easy answer -- labor costs. However, it is also likely that government regulations have helped them to shift jobs south, writes NCPA Contributor Matthew Ruland...

A Health Care Legacy Moonshot for Obama

President Obama has an opportunity to win a positive legacy in health care. Legislation modernizing the FDA, the 21st Century Cures Act, is being fumbled inches away from the Congressional end zone. Presidential leadership is needed, writes NCPA Senior Fellow John R. Graham...

Occupations: A Hierarchy of Regulatory Options

Government regulation has been shown to stifle innovation and entrepreneurship, thus reducing competition. In contrast, empirical studies of deregulated, competitive industries show that innovation creates greater deregulated price reductions, while market-based incentives lower costs, improve quality, and develop new products and services, writes NCPA Senior Fellow Thomas Hemphill...

Hillary's Campaign to Lower Drug Costs Is a Downer No Happy Pill Can Fix

Drug prices have become a campaign issue accompanied by a plethora of bad ideas. Spending on prescription drugs has grown tremendously over the past few decades, mainly due to the increase in the number of diseases and conditions treated using drug therapy. The truth is: most drugs are dirt cheap! Only a small portion -- maybe 1 or 2 percent -- are rather costly, writes NCPA Senior Fellow Devon Herrick in a Townhall column...

Cyber Threats to the Texas Electric Grid

Texas plays a unique role in America's infrastructure as the only state with a self-contained electric grid. The entire U.S. electric power system is a prime target of cyberattacks from hostile governments and terrorist organizations, but the Lone Star State is in a unique position to act, writes NCPA Senior Fellow David Grantham and Research Associate Luke Twombly...

In Defense of High Frequency Trading

Washington recently put Wall Street back into its crosshairs when Representative Peter DeFazio (D-Ore.) introduced a bill to levy a 0.03 percent tax on transactions involving stocks, bonds and derivatives. His goal is to reduce "speculative financial trading" and to "curb near instantaneous high-volume trades that create instability in the stock market and in our national economy." Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton advocates taxing high-volume or High Frequency Trading (HFT). This market activity has been under scrutiny since the Great Recession, and especially since the "Flash Crash" of 2010; but, is high frequency trading really to blame for market crashes? writes NCPA Research Associate John McDonald...


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