NCPA - National Center for Policy Analysis

Daily Policy Digest

Bloomberg-funded Soda Tax Study Does Not Answer the Relevant Questions

A new study on the effect of a countrywide soda tax in Mexico finds that the tax on sugary sodas and fruit drinks reduced consumption by consumers, particularly lower-income households. However, for proponents who want to use soda taxes as a tool to curb obesity, the study proves nothing, writes NCPA Senior Fellow Pamela Villarreal...

Health Spending and Prices to Rise Through 2025

Actuaries at the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services, a government agency, have just updated their estimate of future health spending. Spending on Medicare, Medicaid, and private insurance will increase faster than the recent past, making a mockery of Obamacare's claims, writes NCPA Senior Fellow John R. Graham...

American Patients Have Much, Much Better Access to Cancer Drugs Than Others Do

Of 45 anticancer drug indications approved in the United States between January 1, 2009, and December 31, 2013, 64 percent (29) were approved by the European Medicines Agency; 76 percent (34) were approved in Canada; and 71 percent (32) were approved in Australia between January 1, 2009, and June 30, 2014. The U.S. Medicare program covered all 45 drug indications; the United Kingdom covered 72 percent (21) of those approved in Europe -- only 47 percent (21) of the drug indications covered by Medicare. Canada and France covered 33 percent (15) and 42 percent (19) of the drug indications covered by Medicare, respectively, and Australia was the most restrictive country, covering only 31 percent (14), writes NCPA Senior Fellow John R. Graham...

It's Time to Rethink How We Manage, Pay for Care for The Sickest 10%

Americans are increasingly enrolling in health plans that reimburse none of their medical bills, but are costly nonetheless. Many day-to-day medical care costs are paid entirely out-of-pocket, writes NCPA Senior Fellow Devon Herrick...

Repealing Obamacare Is Good For California Jobs

Obamacare was a cash cow for providers, who now argue it was a program for jobs and economic growth. They now say that repealing Obamacare will kill California jobs. That grabs any politician's attention, but it is not true, writes NCPA Senior Fellow John R. Graham...

Employers Beware, NLRB Shows Grit in Protecting Walkouts and Informal Strikes by Non-union Workers

Employers are finding themselves on thin ice in their response to employees' walkouts, informal strikes and other activities that include demands for higher wages and improved working conditions. However, employees who participate in "general strikes" unrelated to work, such as the "general strike against Trump" planned for February 17, may not be protected by federal labor law, writes NCPA Research Associate Coulter Young...

Social Security Disability Insurance Program is "High Risk," Says GAO

Every two years the Government Accountability Office (GAO) identifies and reports on government operations that are "high risk" -- meaning vulnerable to fraud, waste, abuse, mismanagement and inefficiency. The Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) program has been identified by the GAO as high risk since 2003. According to their 2017 report, some recommended goals have been "partially met," but more needs to be done, writes NCPA Senior Fellow Pam Villarreal...

The Failure of a Dam in California Is Warning About the Grid

What in the world does the frightening news about the Oroville Dam in California have to do with America's electric grid? Answer: the failure of the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC), writes NCPA Senior Fellow David Grantham...

Soda Taxes: Regressive and Unnecessary

A soda tax internalizes the negative externalities of market activities -- in this case the "public" health costs of obesity and other diseases -- by assessing at least a portion of these costs to consumers or soft drink manufacturers. Soda taxes are also flat taxes, thus regressive in nature, negatively impacting lower-income consumers, writes NCPA Senior Fellow Thomas Hemphill...

Celebrity Apprentice and Medical Innovation Have Something Important in Common

A new report should help President Trump find his way out of the confusion suggested by his very mixed signals on the role of medical innovation to American prosperity and patient. The same policies which protect his investment in reality TV ensure medical innovators can invest in research and development, writes NCPA Senior Fellow John R. Graham...


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