NCPA - National Center for Policy Analysis

Daily Policy Digest

Increasing Prison Labor

Employing idle federal prisoners could reduce crime and the cost of incarcerating them, while increasing economic growth....

Prison Labor Fell

Working prisoners fell from 7.6 percent to 6.5 percent of the inmate population since 1990, despite the benefits of work....

Use Of Prison Labor Increases

More than three-quarters of Maine prisoners work and 80,000 prisoners are employed nationwide....

Work In Prison

More work for prisoners could reduce recidivism and fill workforce shortage, say experts....

PRISON CALL CENTERS

At least 2,000 inmates nationwide work in call centers in state and federal prisons...

Using Convict Labor

Prisoners fill need for inexpensive labor while helping jails supplement budgets and relieve overcrowding....

Crime And Labor Markets

Economists have repeatedly found that higher arrest and conviction rates, and longer prison terms, reduce crime...

Is Competition From Federal Prison Industries Fair?

Federal Prison Industries -- a self-supporting arm of the Department of Justice -- has traditionally employed prisoners in making clothing, furniture and other goods for the federal government....

Even With Trump's Support, U.S. Labor Is Singing the Blues

The U.S. Department of Labor's Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) released its annual report on union membership last week, and the numbers are not favorable for the U.S. labor movement. The BLS calculated (from data collected as part of the Current Population Survey) that union membership in 2016 was 10.7 percent, down 0.4 percent from 2015. This percentage loss translates to a decline of 240,000 union members since 2015. In 1983, the first year for which comparable union data is available to the BLS, the union membership rate was 20.1 percent; the 10.7 percent rate represents a 46.8 percent decline in American union membership over the ensuing 34 years. Moreover, as of 2016 there are 14.6 million union members, as compared to 17.7 million union members in 1983, writes NCPA Senior Fellow Thomas Hemphill...

Labor Unions and the Joint Employer Rule

An expanded interpretation of the "joint employer" rule could cost franchise operators billions of dollars and lost jobs, writes NCPA Senior Fellow Pam Villarreal and Research Associate Laura Wiltshire.


2 3 4 5 6 7 8  Older »