NCPA - National Center for Policy Analysis

REPUBLICANS: THE NEW TAX AND SPEND PARTY?

May 18, 2004

The Republican Party has all but abandoned its platform of 'less government, low taxes,' at the state level, according to USA Today.

  • In Ohio, the Republican-controlled legislature and governor's office has increased spending by 71 percent over ten years, mainly through sales tax and gasoline tax increases, as well as higher fees on small businesses.
  • In Idaho, Republican governor Dirk Kempthorne requested a 1.5-cent sales tax increase, and was given a 1-cent sales tax increase by the Republican-controlled legislature.
  • In Georgia, the first Republican governor in over 100 years proposed raising taxes in 2003 to reduce the state's budget deficit.Moreover, Virginia's Republican-controlled legislature approved a tax hike of $1.5 billion to spend on education, roads and other needs. The increase was even more than Democratic Governor Mark Warner's proposal of $360 million. Indeed, some Republicans were dismayed over the dissipation of the party's long-standing core values of less government and lower taxes.

However, Grover Norquist of Americans for Tax Reform argues that Republicans are still in the business of cutting taxes:

  • On the federal level, 212 Republican House Representatives and 42 Republican Senators have signed a Taxpayer Protection Pledge against any tax increases.
  • Most of the state-level Republicans voting for tax hikes are "older, Nixon Republicans," says Norquist, and their numbers are dwindling.
  • The Republican party fought against tax hikes in California during Governor Gray Davis' tenure, and they have successfully fought against tax increases in Oregon and Alabama.

Source: "Look Who's Raising Taxes: Republican-run States," and Grover Norquist, "Tax Hikers are Relics of Past," USA Today, May 17, 2004.

For texthttp://www.usatoday.com/news/opinion/editorials/2004-05-16-our-view_x.htm

http://www.usatoday.com/news/opinion/editorials/2004-05-16-oppose_x.htm

 

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