NCPA - National Center for Policy Analysis

THE GODS ARE LAUGHING

June 16, 2006

Real climate scientists are crying over Al Gore's new film, says Tom Harris, in the National Post of Canada. This is not just because the ex-vice-president commits numerous basic science mistakes. They are also concerned that many in the media and public will fail to realize that "An Inconvenient Truth," amounts to little more than science fiction.

For example:

  • Gore's credibility is damaged early in the film when he tells the audience that by simply looking at Antarctic ice cores with the naked eye one can see when the American Clean Air Act was passed. Ian Clark, professor of Earth Sciences at the University of Ottawa explains that air over the United States doesn't even circulate to the Antarctic before mixing with most of the northern, then the southern hemisphere air and this process takes decades.
  • Gore repeatedly labels carbon dioxide as "global warming pollution" when, in reality, it is no more a pollutant than is oxygen; similarly, the fact that water vapor constitutes 95 percent of greenhouse gases by volume is conveniently ignored by Gore.
  • On hurricanes, Gore implies that new records are being set as a result of human greenhouse gas emissions; but he fails to note that the only region to show an increase in hurricanes in recent years is the North Atlantic.

In their open letter to the Prime Minister of Canada on April, 61 of the world's leading experts modestly expressed their understanding of the science: "The study of global climate change is an 'emerging science,' one that is perhaps the most complex ever tackled. It may be many years yet before we properly understand the Earth's climate system." It seems like liberal arts graduate Al Gore thinks he knows better, says Harris.

Source: Tom Harris, "The God's Are Laughing," National Post, June 7, 2006.

For text:

http://www.canada.com/nationalpost/financialpost/story.html?id=d0235a70-33f1-45b3-803b-829b1b3542ef&rfp=dta

 

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