NCPA - National Center for Policy Analysis

HEART DISEASE: HIGHER RISK LINKED WITH MOTHERS, STUDYFINDS

May 2, 2006

Individuals whose mothers had heart disease have a higher risk for the condition than those whose fathers had heart disease, according to a recent study.

For the study, scheduled to appear in the June issue of the American Journal of Preventive Medicine, researchers at the Karolinska Institute Center for Family Medicine in Stockholm used Swedish government registries to compile a database of all men and women born in the nation since 1932 and their parents, as well as heart disease-related hospital admissions and deaths among both groups.

According to researchers:

  • Men whose mothers had heart disease had a 55 percent increased risk for the condition and that those whose fathers had heart disease had a 41 percent increased risk.
  • Men whose mothers and fathers both had heart disease had a 109 percent increased risk for the condition.
  • The results were similar for women.
  • Also, men and women with at least one parent who developed premature heart disease -- before age 65 in mothers and before age 55 in fathers -- had additional risk for the condition.

Study co-author Kristina Sundquist says that mothers might have more effect on risk for heart disease because of genetics or because of risky habits and behaviors developed during childhood.

Source: "Moms Most Likely to Pass Heart Disease on to Kids," Forbes, April 28, 2006.

 

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