NCPA - National Center for Policy Analysis

The Veterans Independence Act: A Feasible Veterans' Health Care Reform

March 6, 2015

In 2011, Mitt Romney suggested that veterans' health care should be privatized. He was criticized by the usual suspects on the left and by the Veterans of Foreign Wars (VFW). Then, last year's Veterans Administration (VA) scandal compelled the nation to notice the VA's brand of government-run medicine was far worse than previously imagined.

For all the claims that veterans do not want privatized health care, Concerned Veterans for America and the Tarrance Group conducted a nationwide survey of over 1,000 veterans that suggested otherwise. The results show:

  • 88 percent of respondents agreed that eligible veterans should be given the choice to receive medical care from any source of their choice.
  • 95 percent said it was "extremely" or "very important" to have the option to seek the best possible care, even if that means receiving treatment outside of a VA facility.
  • 77 percent of veterans thought it was "extremely" or "very important" to give veterans more choices in their insurance products, even if those alternatives involved higher out-of-pocket costs like co-pays and deductibles.

Today, Concerned Veterans for America is publishing the most comprehensive reform proposal in decades, and ensures veterans gain access to the same high-quality health care available to most Americans.

The Veterans Independence Act seeks to address the same basic problems lawmakers faced when they tried to reform the VA in prior years. It strives to achieve deficit neutrality by including some co-pays and deductibles in the private coverage options and restructuring the VA hospital and clinical facilities.

Source: Avik Roy, "The Veterans Independence Act: Giving Vets A Way Out Of Socialized Medicine," Manhattan Institute for Policy Research, February 26, 2015.

 

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