Docs Resisting ObamaCare

October 30, 2013

A poll conducted by the New York State Medical Society finds that 44 percent of MDs said they are not participating in the nation's new health-care plan.

  • Another 33 percent say they're still not sure whether to become ObamaCare providers.
  • Only 23 percent of the 409 physicians queried said they're taking patients who signed up through health exchanges.

"This is so poorly designed that a lot of doctors are afraid to participate," said Dr. Sam Unterricht, president of the 29,000-member organization. "There's a lot of resistance. Doctors don't know what they're going to get paid."

  • Three out of four doctors who are participating in the program said they "had to participate" because of existing contractual obligations with an insurer or medical provider, not because they wanted to.
  • Only one in four "affirmatively" chose to sign up for the exchanges.
  • Nearly eight in 10 - 77 percent - said they had not been given a fee schedule to show much they'll get paid if they sign up.

The survey invited doctors to anonymously share opinions about the new health care law, and many took time out of their busy days to vent.

One physician was so disgusted, he threatened to taken only cash patients going forward. Some physicians said the pressure on insurance carriers to control costs is leading to rationed care. And they worry that stingy payments for medical services offered by insurers could put some doctors out of business and force others into retirement.

"Any doctor who accepts the exchange is just a bad businessman/woman. Pays terrible," argued one doctor.

Said another MD, "Can't imagine any doctors would be willing to work for so little money? All doctors should boycott."

Doctors complained they've gotten the shaft for years even before ObamaCare.

Others said they don't have enough information to make an informed choice.

"This is a joke. We are flying blind," said one doctor.

Source:  Carl Campanile, "Docs Resisting ObamaCare," New York Post, October 29. 2013.

 

Browse more articles on Health Issues