Obama Clings to Climate Change Science That Now Looks Very Wrong

September 27, 2013

Flying under the media radar largely due to the ongoing Syrian crisis, President Obama has in the past two weeks signed on to three multinational climate agreements aimed at limiting greenhouse gases and dealing with sea level rise, says H. Sterling Burnett, a senior fellow at the National Center for Policy Analysis.

  • Despite dire predictions of a total loss of ice in the Arctic by 2013, the Arctic ice cap actually grew by 60 percent over the summer of 2013.
  • Rather than increasing in frequency or power, the Atlantic Hurricane season is experiencing one of its quietest years on record.
  • Sea levels are rising, yes -- as they have consistently done since the end of the last ice age. But at just 2/16 of an inch per year, sea levels are rising at a far slower rate now than they have on average for the past 17,000 years.
  • Weather-related deaths are lower now than at any time in human history, with fewer than 19,000 per year. That's compared to 485,000 annual weather-related deaths in the 1920s.

Moreover, as the National Center for Policy Analysis's updated Global Warming Primer shows, these events are not flukes. Indeed, again and again, the United Nation's Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change's (IPCC) predictions have proven themselves to be wrong, and with each new report, the predicted harms either have had to be dropped entirely or scaled back dramatically.

With the IPCC numbers declining every time a new report is released, it is still unclear to what extent, if at all, humans are contributing to global warming. Certainly, President Obama should not be signing new climate change agreements based on predictions that keep changing year-to-year.

Source: H. Sterling Burnett, "Obama Clings to Climate Change Science That Now Looks Very Wrong," Investor's Business Daily, September 27, 2013. "Global Warming Primer 2nd Edition," National Center for Policy Analysis, September 12, 2013.

 

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