NCPA - National Center for Policy Analysis

MEDICAL SCHOOLS CAN'T KEEP UP

April 14, 2010

The new federal health care law has raised the stakes for hospitals and schools already scrambling to train more doctors.  Experts warn there will not be enough doctors to treat the millions of people newly insured under the law.  At current graduation and training rates, the nation could face a shortage of as many as 150,000 doctors in the next 15 years, according to the Association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC). 

That shortfall is predicted despite a push by teaching hospitals and medical schools to boost the number of U.S. doctors, which now totals about 954,000. 

The greatest demand will be for primary care physicians.  These general practitioners, internists, family physicians and pediatricians will have a larger role under the new law, coordinating care for each patient, says the Wall Street Journal: 

  • The United States has 352,908 primary care doctors now, and the AAMC estimates that 45,000 more will be needed by 2020.
  • But the number of medical school students entering family medicine fell more than a quarter between 2002 and 2007.
  • A shortage of primary care and other physicians could mean more-limited access to health care and longer wait times for patients. 

Meanwhile, a number of new medical schools have opened around the country recently: 

  • As of last October, four new medical schools enrolled a total of about 190 students, and 12 medical schools raised the enrollment of first-year students by a total of 150 slots, according to the AAMC.
  • Some 18,000 students entered U.S. medical schools in the fall of 2009, the AAMC says. 

But medical colleges and hospitals warn that these efforts will hit a big bottleneck: There is a shortage of medical resident positions.  The residency is the minimum three year period when medical school graduates train in hospitals and clinics. 

Source: Suzanne Sataline and Shirley S. Wang, "Medical Schools Can't Keep Up," Wall Street Journal, April 12, 2010. 

For text:

http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424052702304506904575180331528424238.html 

 

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