NCPA - National Center for Policy Analysis

Daily Policy Digest

Occupations: A Hierarchy of Regulatory Options

Government regulation has been shown to stifle innovation and entrepreneurship, thus reducing competition. In contrast, empirical studies of deregulated, competitive industries show that innovation creates greater deregulated price reductions, while market-based incentives lower costs, improve quality, and develop new products and services, writes NCPA Senior Fellow Thomas Hemphill...

Hillary's Campaign to Lower Drug Costs Is a Downer No Happy Pill Can Fix

Drug prices have become a campaign issue accompanied by a plethora of bad ideas. Spending on prescription drugs has grown tremendously over the past few decades, mainly due to the increase in the number of diseases and conditions treated using drug therapy. The truth is: most drugs are dirt cheap! Only a small portion -- maybe 1 or 2 percent -- are rather costly, writes NCPA Senior Fellow Devon Herrick in a Townhall column...

Cyber Threats to the Texas Electric Grid

Texas plays a unique role in America's infrastructure as the only state with a self-contained electric grid. The entire U.S. electric power system is a prime target of cyberattacks from hostile governments and terrorist organizations, but the Lone Star State is in a unique position to act, writes NCPA Senior Fellow David Grantham and Research Associate Luke Twombly...

In Defense of High Frequency Trading

Washington recently put Wall Street back into its crosshairs when Representative Peter DeFazio (D-Ore.) introduced a bill to levy a 0.03 percent tax on transactions involving stocks, bonds and derivatives. His goal is to reduce "speculative financial trading" and to "curb near instantaneous high-volume trades that create instability in the stock market and in our national economy." Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton advocates taxing high-volume or High Frequency Trading (HFT). This market activity has been under scrutiny since the Great Recession, and especially since the "Flash Crash" of 2010; but, is high frequency trading really to blame for market crashes? writes NCPA Research Associate John McDonald...

Donald Trump's Tax Plan under the NCPA's Model of the U.S. Economy

Presidential candidate Donald Trump's revised tax plan (Trump 2.0) would increase private sector jobs by 3 million in 2017 alone, writes NCPA Senior Fellow Pamela Villarreal...

Medicare Accountable Care Organizations Continue to Underwhelm

Medicare's Accountable Care Organizations (ACOs), which launched in 2012, were supposed to introduce a significant shift away from paying for "volume" to paying for "value." If ACOs pass certain thresholds of cost and quality, they can pocket some of the savings. The 2015 results for Medicare's ACOs have been reported, and the results are underwhelming.

Medical Prices Rose 10 Times More Than Non-Medical Prices in August

The Consumer Price Index rose 0.2 percent in August. Medical prices, however, continued their upward march, increasing by one full percent -- 10 times more than non-medical consumer goods and services. If prices for medical care had been flat, the CPI would have risen by just 0.1 percent, writes NCPA Senior Fellow John R. Graham...

What Is A Health Insurance Market Where No Health Insurance Is Offered?

Obamacare is becoming a Zen philosophical riddle: What is a health insurance market where no health insurance is offered? Obamacare appears to be in a death spiral, with a shrinking pool of insurers offering coverage, far fewer individuals purchasing insurance than advocates had anticipated, and double-digit price increases making policies unaffordable, writes NCPA Senior Fellow John. R.Graham...

Taxi versus Uber: The Regulations, the People, the Money and the Future

The ride-hailing service Uber is only six years old, yet it has already inspired a host of imitators, such as Lyft, Wingz and Taxify. It has also sparked fierce opposition from the taxi industry, which is being undercut by Uber's business model, writes NCPA Research Associate David Sobczak...

EpiPen: A Case Study in Health Insurance Failure

EpiPen is a case study in how health insurance distorts our choices and increases their cost. I learned this by following an Internet advertisement for EpiPen down its rabbit hole. The ad induced me to download my "EpiPen Savings Card" which would ensure I paid nothing for my EpiPens, writes NCPA Senior Fellow John. R Graham...


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