Testimonies, Speeches and Comments

The NCPA has a highly effective office in Washington, D.C. that sponsors Capitol Hill briefings, conferences and testimony by NCPA experts before congressional committees. The NCPA serves as a source of "outside the Beltway" thinking for Capitol Hill deliberations.

  • Jun 16, 2016

    The NLRB Joint Employer Rule Creates New Challenges in the Complex Relationship between Employers and Unions

    Chairman Vitter and members of the committee, thank you for the opportunity to submit written comments about the NLRB joint employer rule and the implications on employers and unions.  I am Pamela Villarreal, a senior fellow at the National Center for Policy Analysis.  We are a nonprofit, nonpartisan public policy research organization dedicated to developing and promoting private alternatives to government regulation and control, solving problems by relying on the strength of the competitive, entrepreneurial private sector.

    Two significant rulings by the National Labor Relations Board in 2015 expanded the interpretation of the “joint employer” rule.  Joint employer is a designation given when two firms are involved in the employment practices of an employee.

    In a case involving Browning Ferris Industries, the NRLB ruled that Browning Ferris was not only responsible for those it employed directly, but also contractors and those “indirectly” employed by the firm.  Thus, they would be liable for labor violations committed by contractors even when they have only indirect or unexercised control over employment conditions.

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  • Jun 01, 2016

    NCPA to Hensarling: Do Not Underestimate the Dangerous Conflict Mineral Provision in Dodd-Frank

    On behalf of the National Center for Policy Analysis (NCPA), I am writing to express our support for your efforts to create a pro-growth, pro-consumer alternative to the Dodd-Frank Act. The NCPA is a non-profit, nonpartisan public policy research organization dedicated to developing and promoting private alternatives to government regulation and control. We do not endorse specific pieces of legislation. Nevertheless, we strongly support your Principles of Financial Opportunity, particularly those policies addressing the need for competition and the need for less regulatory complexity.

    Tucked deep inside the Dodd-Frank Act is a small but important provision on conflict minerals. Much like your description of the entire bill as a monument to "arrogance and hubris," Section 1502 on conflict minerals reflects the same and should be tossed into "the trash heap of history."

    The Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC), a former Belgian colony and second largest country in Africa, experienced a brutal, decade-long civil war during the 1990s that claimed millions of lives. The newly established DRC government told a handful of U.S. officials in 2007 that conflict lingered in the east because rebels funded their operations through the sale of minerals. That conversation gave birth to the idea of regulating conflict minerals. Legislation was introduced in Congress to force publicly-owned U.S. businesses to inspect their supply chains and declare the use of minerals sourced from the DRC, namely tungsten, tin, tantalum and gold. These minerals can be found in an assortment ofproducts like clothing, electronics and household goods. Advocacy groups and Hollywood elites pressured Congress to use Dodd-Frank as the vehicle to pass the stalled legislation. In the end, the U.S. response to a domestic mortgage crisis included this bizarre regulation aimed at the Congolese rebels and conflict minerals.

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  • May 17, 2016

    Texas Grid and U.S. National Security

    Chairman Perry and members of the Subcommittee, thank you for the opportunity to submit written comments about the EMP threat to our nation’s electric grids. I am David Grantham, a senior fellow at the National Center for Policy Analysis. We are a nonprofit, nonpartisan public policy research organization dedicated to developing and promoting private alternatives to government regulation and control, solving problems by relying on the strength of the competitive, entrepreneurial private sector.


  • Apr 19, 2016

    Shutting Down ISIS’ Antiquities Trade

    Chairman Fitzpatrick and members of the Task Force, thank you for the opportunity to submit written comments about the ISIS antiquities trade. I am David Grantham, a senior fellow at the National Center for Policy Analysis. We are a nonprofit, nonpartisan public policy research organization dedicated to developing and promoting private alternatives to government regulation and control, solving problems by relying on the strength of the competitive, entrepreneurial private sector.


  • Mar 14, 2016

    Letter to Rep McMorris Rodgers

    March 14, 2016

    The Honorable Cathy McMorris Rodgers, Chair
    House Republican Conference
    203 Cannon House Office Building
    Washington, D.C. 20515

    Dear Madam Chair,

    On behalf of the National Center for Policy Analysis (NCPA), I am writing to express our support for your efforts to restrict appropriations for unauthorized programs. The NCPA is a non-profit, nonpartisan public policy research organization dedicated to developing and promoting private alternatives to government regulation and control. We do not endorse specific pieces of legislation. Nevertheless, we strongly support the objectives contained within your Unauthorized Spending Accountability Act.

    When Congress appropriates taxpayer dollars for unauthorized programs, it is a failure of Congressional oversight responsibilities. Frankly, we believe that Congress should handle taxpayer dollars more carefully to avoid the type of waste and abuse that we have sadly seen from federal spending programs over the years. Your bill would create incentives for Congress to carefully examine federal spending through the authorization process before an appropriation is made.

    The House Armed Services Committee is a good model of frequent oversight as they reauthorize the nation’s military programs every year. Perhaps every federal program doesn’t need to be reauthorized every year, but the same sort of frequent review—whether every year, or every five years, or somewhere in between—is necessary if Congress is going to provide the type of scrutiny and oversight that is needed. It is what Americans expect Congress to do with the hard-earned tax dollars they send to Washington.

    As you move forward with this worthwhile idea, allow me to offer two ideas that will improve your efforts:

    1. The Rules of the House of Representatives (clause 2(a)(1) of rule XXI) already prohibit appropriations for unauthorized programs. In other words, regular order already requires programs to be authorized before they receive appropriations. Yet the House Rules Committee routinely waives that rule for appropriations bills. As part of the House Republican Article I Task Force initiative, and your overall efforts to return to regular order, why not simply enforce rule XXI? This action could be taken immediately, instead of waiting for your legislation to be passed and signed by the President (an unlikely outcome, in spite of the worthwhile objectives). And it has the added benefit of sending an immediate and clear signal to the President that Congress can exercise its Article I appropriation authority without any need for the President to sign a law or otherwise cooperate.
    2. Your legislation would create a new Spending Accountability Commission to examine unauthorized programs. This is a basic duplication of work that the authorizing committees should already be doing. Instead of allocating new funds for this new commission, I suggest cutting the existing budgets of the authorizing committees and using the savings to fund this new commission. This would create a strong incentive for the authorizing committees to do their work, or risk losing their funding to a commission that will do their work for them.

    This is a critical time for our nation. The upcoming elections, like all elections, pose an opportunity for the American people to voice their concerns about the failures of Congress to perform basic duties, like oversight and program authorization. Your leadership is much appreciated.

    Steadfast and Loyal,

    Lieutenant Colonel Allen B. West (US Army, Ret)
    Executive Director and Vice Chairman of the Board
    National Center for Policy Analysis

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