The Physical Evidence of Earth's Unstoppable 1,500-Year Climate Cycle

Studies | Environment | Global Warming

No. 279
Friday, September 30, 2005
by S. Fred Singer & Dennis T. Avery


Summing Up the Worldwide Physical Evidence

One of the broadest and most revealing sets of physical evidence — with testimony from outside the North Atlantic region — comes from Yang Bao of the Chinese Academy of Sciences. He reconstructed China’s temperature history for the last 2,000 years from ice cores, lake sediments, peat bogs, tree rings and the historic documents that date back in China farther than in any other country. He found China had its highest temperatures during the second and third centuries, toward the end of the Roman Warming.91 China’s climate was also warm from 800 to 1400, cold from 1400 to 1920, and began to warm again after 1920.

We have less extensive documentation of North American climate change, but as the sidebar shows, the existing evidence corresponds to that gathered elsewhere in the world. [See Climate Cycling in North America.]

"The geographic range and variety of evidence for a 1,500-year climate cycle is too great to dismiss."

This paper has offered a sampling of the Earth’s physical evidence of past climate cycles documented by researchers around the world in recent decades, from tree rings and ice cores, from stalagmites and dust plumes, from prehistoric villages and collapsed cultures, from fossilized pollen and algae skeletons, from titanium profiles and niobium ions. The evidence has come from around the world.

Evidence of a 1,500-year climate cycle is clear and convincing. Models that posit a human impact on the climate must better take this evidence into account before any conclusions are drawn regarding humanity’s ability to prevent future climate change.

NOTE: Nothing written here should be construed as necessarily reflecting the views of the National Center for Policy Analysis or as an attempt to aid or hinder the passage of any bill before Congress.


Read Article as PDF