Environment

Subsidizing Disaster

Hurricane Katrina has focused attention on the increasing cost of natural disasters. Some federal programs unintentionally contribute to those losses. Federal flood insurance and U.S. Army Corps of En…

An Ill Wind for Consumers: The Energy Bill

One of the most important differences facing a congressional conference committee reconciling the Senate and House versions of the 2005 energy bill is a Renewable Portfolio Standard (RPS) that appears…

Dispelling the Myths About Nuclear Power

The manifest benefits of nuclear technology - from radiological medical screening and treatments, to smoke detectors, to electric power generation - have not dispelled the common belief that it is und…

Burning Bright: Nuclear Energy’s Future

U.S. demand for electricity will increase 50 percent by 2025, according to forecasts in the Energy Information Administration's (EIA) "Annual Energy Outlook 2004." At least 350,000 megawatts of new ge…

Regulating Greenhouse Gas Emissions

The 1997 Kyoto Protocol is an international treaty designed to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. Proponents hoped that it would help the world avoid catastrophe caused by human induced climate change.…

Kerry’s Energy Plan: Inconsistent, Expensive, Leaving America Less Secure

Sen. John Kerry's (D-Mass.) energy plan promises to reduce energy prices, maintain diversity of supply while reducing greenhouse gas emissions and improve our domestic energy security. However, his go…

Applying the Precautionary Principle to DDT

In the past quarter-century environmentalists rediscovered the old adage, “better safe than sorry,” repackaged it as the “precautionary principle,” and with the aid of their allies in European governm…

Energy Bill: Who Will Keep the Lights On?

Congress responded to the August 2003 northeastern electrical blackout by revising provisions of the comprehensive energy legislation with which it and the Administration had been grappling for two ye…