Studies

NCPA studies generally break new ground on policy issues. A study seeks to cast new light on an issue and to stimulate policy-makers and others to think of new, innovative solutions to the problems associated with the issue. Studies may combine several elements of analysis, including original research, reviews of academic literature, creative approaches for solving public policy problems, and economic modeling.

Why Not The Best? NCPA Task Force On Education: Certification Of Texas Teachers

A proposal currently before the Texas State Board of Education threatens to do great harm to the school children of Texas.

Solving The Problem Of Medicare

Medicare is bankrupt. At the moment a small surplus exists in Medicare's Hospital Insurance Trust Fund. Yet by any reasonable prediction, that surplus will vanish in a few short years as expenditures…

Private Pensions in Crisis: The Case for Radical Reform

The American private pension industry is in crisis. Although this crisis arises in the private sector of the economy, it is not the result of voluntary exchange in the free marketplace. It is instead…

Explaining the Economic Gender Gap

Despite the enactment of the Equal Pay Act of 1963 and the Civil Rights of 1964, the wage differentil between women and men has not decreased.

Welfare Report

The welfare system of the United States is creating proverty, not destroying it. The War on Poverty not only is not being won, but the weapons designed to defeat poverty are being used to insure its p…

The Failure of our Public Schools: The Causes and Solutions

The educational foundations of our society are presently being eroded by a rising tide of mediocrity that threatens our very future as a nation and a people.

The Effect Of The Social Security System On Black Americans

Like many economic policies of government, Social Security allocates a tax burden and redistributes income among the American people. For some citizens, participation in Social Security will be a net…

The R.E.A.L. Federal Dificit

This year total direct and indirect borrowing by the federal government will reach $324 billion--over $100 billion more than what is reported by the "official" federal deficit.