Special Publications

The NCPA occasionally produces special publications, such as Briefing Books, Conference Proceedings and Copublications with other institutes. Studies by NCPA scholars published elsewhere are included by permission.

Income Distribution: Stagnant or Mobile?

The problem for the Democrats is that the American people don't believe in class warfare. They don't hate the rich because they are rich. On the contrary, they want nothing more than to emulate them.…

Economic Freedom Index of North America 2005

This is the third edition of the annual report, Economic Freedom of North America. The statistical results of this year's study persuasively confirm those published in the previous two editions: econo…

Solving the Problem of the Uninsured

The fact that millions of Americans do not have health insurance is said to be a major problem, if not the major problem, of the United States health care system.

Reforming the Health Care System

Reforming the Health Care System was held March 18, 2005 at Ball State University as part of a larger conference, Health by Design. Reforming the Health Care System featured a debate between Kenneth E…

Unneccessary Deaths: The Human and Financial Costs of Hospital Infections

Infections contracted in hospitals are the fourth largest killer in America. Every year in this country, two million patients contract infections in hospitals, and an estimated 103,000 die as a result…

Measuring Labour Markets in Canada and the United States: 2004 edition

Measuring Labour Markets in Canada and the United States: 2004 Edition is the second instalment in ongoing research to assess the performance of labour markets and explain why results differ among jur…

A Brief History of Health Savings Accounts

It seems unlikely that HSAs would exist today were it not for the activities of the NCPA, although other groups were also important - including the Council for Affordable Health Insurance (CAHI), the…

Designing Ideal Health Insurance

The modern era has inherited two models of health insurance: the fee-for-service model and the HMO model. Neither is appropriate to the Information Age.