Brief Analyses

Restricted to two letter-size pages, a Brief Analysis summarizes some aspect or aspects of a public policy issue, presenting points for consideration in policy debates or responding to points that have been raised during these debates.

Clinton's Child Care Proposals: The Mediocre, the Bad and the Ugly

President Clinton wants to raise the Child and Dependent Tax Credit for most families with adjusted gross incomes of $60,000 or less. Currently, families earning $10,000 or less can get a credit equal…

10 Guidelines for Insuring Children

The 1997 budget agreement includes a provision giving the states $24 billion over five years to provide health insurance to uninsured children from low-income families - basically those in families wi…

Explaining the Growing Number of Uninsured

The number of people without health insurance continues to grow. The most recent U.S. Census Bureau estimate places the number at 41.4 million people, or 17.7 percent of the nonelderly population - up…

Solving the Problems of Managed Care

Not long ago, American health care was easily the best in the world. Today, we face a quality crisis. Almost 60 million Americans are now members of health maintenance organizations (HMOs), and an est…

Wrong Medicine at the Wrong Time

With Medicare teetering on the edge of bankruptcy, President Clinton is proposing to add more beneficiaries and more costs. Specifically, all Americans ages 62 to 64 (the Medicare eligibility age is 6…

Can the IRS Be Reformed?

Since ancient times, people have feared and suffered at the hands of tax collectors. The ancient writer Lactantius tells us that Roman tax collectors would always double the tax when they were sent to…

Can We Afford Consumer Protection? An Analysis of the PARCA Bill

Despite a new government study showing that the rising cost of premiums is the main reason a growing number of people don't have health insurance, more than 200 members of Congress have cosponsored le…

Crime Is Down Because Punishment Is Up

The amount of serious crime has decreased in most towns and cities across the country. New York City, for example, had fewer than 1,000 murders in 1996, the lowest number in nearly 30 years. Overall c…