NCPA Media: News Release

  • Jul 25, 2016

    National Center for Policy Analysis Names Kristina E. Barton Special Assistant to the President

    Dallas, TX (July 25, 2016) – The National Center for Policy Analysis (NCPA) is pleased to announce Kristina E. Barton as Special Assistant to the President and CEO, James H. Amos, Jr.  

    Building on extensive experience as a major donor fundraiser, Kristina will spearhead the efforts of the office of the President related to investor relations, business development, fundraising and events, and the overall strategic advancement of the NCPA.


  • Jul 20, 2016

    Medicare’s “Doc Fix” Won’t Fix Much

    Initial Assessments Reveal Increased Regulation, Costs: NCPA

    Dallas, TX (7/20/2016) – The “doc fix” contained in the Medicare Access and CHIP Reauthorization Act (MACRA) is fiscally irresponsible, and will only increase federal control over how doctors practice medicine, warns a new report by National Center for Policy Analysis Senior Fellow John R. Graham.


  • Jul 11, 2016

    U.S. is Losing its Economic Freedom

    Diminishing Freedom is Hampering Economic Growth: NCPA

    Dallas, TX (7/11/2016) – The United States has fallen from 3rd to 16th in worldwide economic freedom – and its slowing our economic growth, according to a new report from the National Center for Policy Analysis by Southern Methodist University Research Assistant Professor Ryan H. Murphy. 


  • Jul 08, 2016

    How Congress Can Curb Opioid Abuse: NCPA Report

    E-prescribing is Key to Reducing Fraud & Abuse

    Dallas, TX (7/8/2016) – Today’s vote on a House bill to reduce opioid abuse did not include a key solution to the growing opioid pan reliever epidemic: mandatory electronic prescribing. E-prescribing would make a significant dent in the rate of fraud, resale and abuse of opioids, according to a new study by National Center for Policy Analysis Senior Fellow Devon Herrick.


  • Jun 28, 2016

    “Joint Employment” and Unions Bad for Small Business: NCPA

    The National Labor Relations Board’s expanded interpretation of “joint employment” could severely hurt small businesses and franchises, warns a new report by National Center for Policy Analysis Senior Fellow Pam Villarreal and Research Associate Laura Wiltshire.

    “It would be costly for franchise owners to comply with union demands, and some may simply go out of business,” writes Villarreal.

    The impetus for the expanded interpretation was to ease unionization of small businesses that are franchisees of corporations, such as restaurant and retail food chains. But unions have generally been found to lower profitability for firms. One such study on U.S. supermarkets found:

    • When controlling for other variables that affect profitability — such as market size, market growth, firm size, expenditures on entry and others — unionized supermarket profits were 76 percent lower than non-union supermarkets.
    • This effect was most pronounced in concentrated markets rather than more competitive markets.

    Franchise restaurants could face a similar fate. “The franchise sector generates more than $2 trillion in economic activity and employs 20 million people,” write Villarreal and Wiltshire. “It would be a mistake to hamstring it with the costs and responsibilities of a poorly interpreted and overreaching rule that would provide no economic benefit to such a significant industry.”

    Labor Unions and the Joint Employer Rule

     


  • Jun 21, 2016

    Cutting Competition Won’t Solve the Problem of Rising Drug Prices

    Overregulating Drug Plans Could Raise Costs to Consumers: NCPA

    Dallas, TX

    Would requiring disclosure of wholesale prices lower prescription drug costs? Experts say no, according to a new report by National Center for Policy Analysis Senior Fellow Devon Herrick.

    In a misguided attempt to combat the high prices of some new and specialty drugs, a few politicians and trade lobbyists for pharmacies and drug makers have begun to blame high drug prices on the administrators of employee drug plans – suggesting drug plans are not passing on their discounts to consumers and employers.

    This “bogus argument” posits that drug prices would be lower if drug plans were required to disclose the wholesale prices – a requirement that would be detrimental to any wholesale industry.

    Regardless of the industry, wholesale prices are often negotiated among private parties and are generally considered proprietary. “If competing hardware stores knew the exact wholesale prices Home Depot negotiated with suppliers, all competing stores would bargain aggressively for the same price. Over time, the likely result is that manufacturers would ultimately set one uniform wholesale price higher than the price volume purchasers would otherwise obtain,” says Herrick.

    The end result? Highly competitive firms would no longer be able to leverage buying power and pass on discounted prices to consumers.

    “Drugs are affordable for most consumers because of competition among Pharmacy Benefit Managers (PBMs),” adds Herrick. “Taking away PBMs’ ability to compete by regulating price transparency would harm consumers in the long run."

    A Bogus Solution for High Drug Costs: http://www.ncpa.org/pub/a-bogus-solution-for-high-drug-costs


  • Jun 03, 2016

    Financial Services Committee to Tackle Dodd-Frank

    Chairman Jeb Hensarling Unveils Key Points of Republican Plan: NCPA

    Dallas, TX

    Because the Dodd-Frank Act is harming the economy and consumers, the House Financial Services Committee plans to offer a pro-growth, pro-consumer replacement, previewed by Chairman Jeb Hensarling at a recent National Center for Policy Analysis briefing in Washington, DC.

    “Dodd-Frank stands as a monument to the arrogance and hubris of man in that its answer to incomprehensible complexity and government control is even more incomprehensible complexity and government control,” says Hensarling. “Dodd-Frank codified too big to fail and taxpayer-funded bailouts into law,” made us less prosperous, and harmed our freedom – and needs to be replaced, he adds.

    Hensarling says the Republican plan will be based on the following principles:

    • Restoring economic growth through competitive, transparent and innovative capital markets;
    • Giving every American the opportunity to achieve financial independence;
    • Protecting consumers from force, fraud and deception, but also from the loss of economic liberty;
    • Ending taxpayer bailouts of financial institutions  and the idea that any company is “too big to fail”;
    • Reducing systemic risk through market discipline;
    • Replacing complexity with simplicity, because complexity can be gamed by the well-connected and abused by Washington bureaucrats;
    • Holding both Wall Street and Washington accountable.

    “In the weeks to come, we on the committee look forward to unveiling this legislation, receiving your feedback, and ultimately earning your support,” says Hensarling. “Because this is a fight for America’s future, and I’m more confident than ever it is a fight we can win.”

    Principles of Financial Opportunity Reforms: http://www.ncpa.org/pub/principles-of-financial-opportunity-reforms 


  • May 31, 2016

    How to Pay for Medicare

    Four reforms could rein in Medicare spending growth: NCPA

    NCPA: Rising numbers of retirees and excess cost growth have made it imperative that we chance how the Medicare is financed – or the cost burden will crush taxpayers, according to a new study by NCPA Senior Fellows Andrew J. Rettenmaier and Thomas R. Saving.