NCPA Media: Environment

  • May 04, 2011

    Bluey and Burnett: More oil would mean smaller deficit

    By blocking drilling, Obama turns down billions in needed revenue

    With the price of oil at more than $100 per barrel, higher gasoline prices are eating into Americans’ budgets. Consumers, however, are not the only ones losing out. The various taxes, lease revenues and royalty payments to federal, state and local governments for oil and gas production on public lands is a significant source of revenue - among the largest sources outside of the personal income tax. Yet, the Obama administration stubbornly clings to a “no new production in our backyard policy” - while blaming oil companies for high prices.


  • May 03, 2011

    This week in gas wars

    Washington Examiner – A summary of upcoming oil-related bills references an NCPA analysis on the impact of the moratorium on offshore drilling.


  • Apr 28, 2011

    Obama 'War on Oil' Policy Increasing Federal Budget Deficit

    Yahoo! News- A new report from the National Center for Policy Analysis titled "The Fiscal Impact of the Offshore Drilling Moratorium" confirms that Obama administration "War on Oil" policies are widening the federal budget deficit.


  • Apr 28, 2011

    Competition, Choice Still Winners For Electricity Consumers

    The Technology of Electricity Changes Constantly; Economics Does Not

    WASHINGTON, D.C. -- In an update of its landmark study on electricity and competition, the National Center for Policy Analysis (NCPA) today released a new study showing that, while deregulation has not been done well in some states, where it has been the delivery of services has improved, generation capacity has been enhanced, and consumers have more and better quality choices. Most important, deregulation is beginning to deliver lower prices.


  • Apr 27, 2011

    Cutting Oil Company Tax Breaks Could Push Prices Up, Analysts Say

    CNSNews.com - President Barack Obama's call to end "subsidies" for oil companies will not lower the price of gas, but could likely increase it, analysts said Tuesday.



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