NCPA Media: NCPA in the News

  • Jun 07, 2007

    Saving may not pay off for poor

    Low-income households face 'astronomical' penalties for saving, according to the report by the National Center for Policy Analysis. For example, each $1 saved by a single mother earning $15,000 a year could cost her $2.60 in higher taxes and lost government benefits.'We're constantly told that we need to save early and often to prepare for retirement,' said Laurence Kotlikoff, professor at Boston University and author of the study. 'Yet government policies tell low-income families, 'If you save for the future, you won't get our help today.' 'Over the last decade, the government has sharply increased the amounts that Americans can set aside on a tax-favored basis for retirement, created a tax credit for low-income people who fund retirement accounts and launched public campaigns urging people to save.

    Click here to view entire article.


  • May 09, 2007

    Medicare Meltdown

    What's going to happen when the money runs out for Medicare? A recently released report by the program's trustees found that within seven years Medicare taxes will fall short of Medicare expenses by more than 45%. What's more, Medicare and Social ecurity combined are on track to eat up the entire federal budget.

    Click here to view entire article.


  • May 04, 2007

    Dems Want You to Take a Hike

    The hottest domestic political issue of the coming two years will be federal income  taxes.

    Click here to view entire article.


  • Jan 26, 2007

    Health plan aims to reduce uninsured

    WASHINGTON - Get health insurance through your employer? The average cost of a  family policy is about $11,500, low enough to get you a tax break under President George W. Bush's new health care initiative.

    Click here to view entire article.


  • Jan 26, 2007

    Bush's Healthcare Proposal

    George W. Bush's proposal, unveiled in his State of the Union address Tuesday night, to change the tax treatment of health insurance, is worthy of some serious consideration. Bush would make the value of employer-provided health insurance taxable to the employee but would grant a $15,000 exemption for families and $7,500 for individuals for all taxpayers regardless of whether they have employer-provided health insurance.

    Click here to view entire article.



Yearly Archives